Duma Key – Stephen King

A Stephen King fan? Have you read the 2008 novel Duma Key?

Advertisements

Duma-Key-Stephen-King

Duma Key is the 2008 psychological horror by Stephen King. Although I have read a number of King’s short stories, Duma Key is only the second novel of King’s I have read. And again, King was proven that his work is worth the hype that surrounds his back catalogue. The novel centres around Edgar Freemantle, a self-made millionaire, who survives a horrific accident at work. The severity of the accident leaves him with an amputated arm, speech, visual and memory problems and causes him to have terrible mood swings. Following his accident, Edgar moves to a small island in hope an extended vacation will help in his recovery. This island is Duma Key.

I usually get put off by long books, as I find that a novel has to work hard to keep my attention for a long period. Duma Key was around 611 pages and I was a little bit apprehensive as to whether I would successfully complete the novel before boredom stroked. However, I was pleasantly surprised that King was able to keep me interested and engaged throughout the entire novel. Which, I am happy to say, has made me far more open minded when it comes to other books that may be of a longer length.

Duma Key reminded me of King’s short story ‘Obits’. This was due to the way that Edgar was able to make things happen through his paintings. Similarly, in ‘Obits’ the main character was able to kill people by writing up their obituaries. I thoroughly enjoyed ‘Obits’ therefore I was more than happy to read an extended piece of work that had a similar concept. This was because the novel was able to explore the concept in more depth, and we saw Edgar using his new found ‘abilities’ in a variety of ways. This I found to be so much more interesting as we were not just seeing deaths. We were seeing also things like the erasing of a brain tumour, which for me, was far more intriguing of a concept.

Although I thoroughly enjoyed Duma Key, I do feel as though the ending was slightly anticlimactic. I simply felt that there was something missing from the ending chapters of the novel. So, upon finishing the novel I was disappointed. And there’s nothing worse than investing so much time into a novel to only be left disappointed at the end.  I do however realise that I am such a harsh critique when it comes to the end of a story. I am rarely satisfied with a story’ ending, usually because I have already realised where the author is taking me. To King’s credit though I did not guess where he was taking the story of Duma Key, so the ending was a little bit of a surprise.

Although this was the case, I would still recommend Stephen King’s novel, Duma Key. If anything, it is an interesting concept and will truly have you thinking about life. And if you’re somebody who may be put off by King’s work due to his famous psychological/horror approach to his stories, be assured this one will not give you too much of a fright. I believe it is one of his tamer works, though i’m no King expert…so don’t hold me to that.

star-1star-1star-1star-1

The One – John Marrs

Eager to find your perfect match? Well, here Marrs explores the idea of developing our perfect match through our DNA

the-one

John Marrs 2017 novel The One is a story about finding your perfect match. In Marr’s world there has been a development in the world of love which can genetically match you with your perfect match. The novel follows the lives of six individuals who have applied to find their match. Each character takes us on a journey of the positives and negatives of the idea of a perfect match.

I think a novel like The One is very current in where we currently are in the dating world. From apps and websites, to unique dating events like being matched through a scent, it’s safe to say that the dating world has progressed majorly. And, with science continuously moving forward, it’s not difficult to imagine a world whereby we could be matched with a significant other through our DNA. It seems like an easy solution, right? Avoiding any time wasters, eliminating the anxiety of meeting new people, saying goodbye to potential heartbreak because you are not actually suited and you get all this for just a small fee. However, if you’ve ever thought something like this would be a good idea, Marrs novel will surely prove you wrong – or at least question your views. This is because she fantastically emphasises that you never know what somebody is really like, and what is really going on behind closed doors. Therefore this ‘perfect match’ could be exactly what your genetics requires, but they could be the opposite of what your morals and mind wants. – which you will see evidence in this novel.

When I found Marrs novel The One online, I was immediately drawn in by its concept. So, I was very excited to get my claws into this novel. However, it is not just the idea that I loved, the structure and style is something I really enjoyed too. Each chapter focused on a different character, but also some of these characters could be paired off as couples. For example the chapter’s focusing on Amy and Christopher, demonstrate the two sides of a matched couple. This enabled a more rounded picture regarding the matches, as we were seeing both sides of the match, and their feelings and thought processes towards it. It was interesting to read the two sides as one would try to keep a secret from the other, and we are able to witness first hand these secrets ruining the matches.

I found Marrs novel to be a real page turner, but I think this was solely because I enjoyed reading about some character’s stories more than others, so I wanted to get to their chapters quickly. That being said though, I did find the novel to be an easy read, each story flowed well, and the jumping between each character was pretty smooth. So, even though I was drawn to some characters more than others I did not struggle to get into all of the separate stories. The only thing that I would mention about this style of writing, whereby Marr focused on different characters in different chapters, was that at times I found myself having to go back and double check who I was reading about. Because there is so much going on in The One, I found that when you start reading the novel it can be a little complicated to keep up, though with perseverance you get the hang of it!

I would a hundred percent recommend this book, read it if you like a suspense novel, read it if you like the concept of having a genetic match, or read it if you like a quick read. Because if you like any of those things you are sure to get on well with Marrs The One

star-1star-1star-1star-1

Dear Amy – Helen Callaghan

Here I review Helen Callaghan’s debut psychological suspense novel

dear-amy-helen-callaghan

 Dear Amy is the debut psychological suspense novel from Helen Callaghan. The plot focuses around an agony aunt who begins to receive letters from a girl who has been missing for 20 years – and is presumed dead. Margot, the agony aunt, at first believes they are a hoax, but meanwhile another girl has gone missing. As the search for the missing girl gets longer and longer, Margot begins to believe that the letters could mean more than just a silly hoax.

I read Dear Amy quite quickly, which is always a big sign that you are enjoying a novel. It possessed the good elements I like in a psychological thriller, with the tensions continuously climbing. Callaghan’s writing in this novel is also very fluid, which made the reading of story so much easier, hence the quick finish. The premise of the story is also a very interesting one, and I found I grew to like the key character, Margot. So, I found as each page turned I was massively urging Margot to continue in her discoveries, and get to the bottom of the mystery. Like any true psychological thriller there was a huge twist towards the end of the novel. Though this twist turned out to be simply ambitious

When reading Dear Amy, I found it became too obvious where this novel was heading. I can’t pinpoint exactly when I realised I knew where this story was going, but just know I did. This slightly took away from the suspense and tension that Callaghan had been previously developing. Aside from being easily guessed, I feel this last twist is also completely farfetched. So, even if you get to Callaghan’s last twist without guessing the ending, I feel the effect of it is completely diminished by how unrealistic and unbelievable the situation is. Which ultimately takes away from how good the book could have been. So, dare I say that Dear Amy was slightly disappointing?

As I said, I liked the premise of this Dear Amy, and it was well executed until the twist at the end, I was simply left disappointed by how unrealistic it was. However, some might say if you can’t be unrealistic and far-fetched in literature, where can you be? Though personally, I just didn’t feel this was the book to be experimental with realism. I’d recommend you reading this book though if you’re looking for a quick read, something you don’t want to commit to for a long period of time. Its fluidity means it’ll be over in a couple of sittings, whether you enjoy the end or not.

I’d love to know what you felt about this novel, did you guess the ending? Did you find it a little unbelievable? Or did you love it, and find the twist was a great fit?

star-1star-1star-1